Results

This page will display all public deliverables approved by the European Commission.

SP1 - Infrastructure

D11.1 Design requirements and improved guidelines

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This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project. The aim of this deliverable is to identify the design requirements to develop new track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure. Those requirements comprise (...)

This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 1.1 under Sub-Project1 (SP1) of the Capacity4Rail (C4R) project.
The aim of this deliverable is to identify the design requirements to develop new track concepts that address the general objectives of the project, i.e. an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway infrastructure.
Those requirements comprise geometrical, mechanical, environmental, construction, maintenance, operational and safety features that the new track system should accomplish. When possible, the requirements have been differentiated between high-speed and mixed traffic, that are the two scenarios set out in the Description of Work.
The starting point for the developments are the current track systems, that are broadly described in this report, and the regulatory framework, in particular the Technical Specifications for Interoperability (TSI). This will ensure that the new systems are competitive against existing track concepts and will ease the homologation and market implementation in every Member State.
In order to feed the design with cutting-the-edge knowledge on railway infrastructure, three guidelines have been drafted: 1) Deeper knowledge on track actual loads; 2) Resilience to natural events; 3) Combined design to cost and RAMS methodologies. These reports, annexes to the deliverable, are able to be used by designers as stand-alone documents.

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D114 Upgrading of infrastructure in order to meet new operation and market demands

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D131 Operational failure modes of Switches and Crossings

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The density of Switches and crossings (S&C) in most railway networks is estimated to be 1 every km which equates to over 300,000 units within the networks of EU27 countries and the cost of maintenance of an S&C unit is believed to be equivalent to that for 0.3km of plain line track. Further costs are incurred at renewals which, even at very modest rates of renewal, mount up to a very (...)

The density of Switches and crossings (S&C) in most railway networks is estimated to be 1 every km which equates to over 300,000 units within the networks of EU27 countries and the cost of maintenance of an S&C unit is believed to be equivalent to that for 0.3km of plain line track. Further costs are incurred at renewals which, even at very modest rates of renewal, mount up to a very large figure. Thus the economic impact of S&C units on the maintenance and renewal budgets of railway authorities is very apparent. Hence any increase in the life span of this important infrastructure asset through better design or maintenance practices is considered highly desirable and is one of the primary objectives of this project.
The recently completed EU project, Innotrack, has emphasized the need to identify the major cost factors and use this knowledge as the drivers for essential improvements to design, installation, and maintenance practices. An understanding of the degradation mechanisms associated with S&C units is essential for the optimization of design and maintenance procedures to eliminate or minimize the impact of the causes of the life limiting degradation. This deliverable of a catalogue of defects that are encountered in S&C units is a contribution towards this objective.

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SP2 - New Concepts for Efficient Freight systems

D 211 - Requirements toward the freight system of 2030/2050 intermediate

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With WP2.1 “Progress beyond State of the Art on rail freight systems”, the Freight subproject is focusing on the general market trends through the description of today and future demand for rail freight by existing forecasts and describes scenarios for freight flows up to 2030/2050. It performs an analysis of existing and expected future customer requirements for different good segments and, (...)

With WP2.1 “Progress beyond State of the Art on rail freight systems”, the Freight subproject is focusing on the general market trends through the description of today and future demand for rail freight by existing forecasts and describes scenarios for freight flows up to 2030/2050. It performs an analysis of existing and expected future customer requirements for different good segments and, beyond state of the art, identifies the requirements for vehicles, intermodal systems and operation principles that remain to be successively bridged until 2030/2050. Its final objective is to specify the requirements of an efficient freight rail system which can fulfill the EU targets in 2030/2050.

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D221 - Novel Rail Freight Vehicle - intermediate

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WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their (...)

WP22 is aiming to propose solutions to enhance the efficiency of Rail Freight transport. At the beginning a large forwarder operating long distance combined trains across Europe and a Car carrier operating a fleet of more than 3500 wagons involved in multimodal logistics across Europe and being also an ECM for other wagon operators have expressed their most urgent needs to increase their efficiency by reducing their operating costs while improving the quality of service. The tools that this work package wanted to develop was to increase the usable length of a standard train with new wagon designs having a lower LCC. At thesame time improving the asset rotation with synchronous braking of all wagons could have reduced the wear and tear of the new composite brake blocks aiming at reducing noise.
Several designs have been studied for car carrier wagons reaching 5 bodies with 6 axels for an overall length of around 62m. For container traffics two ideas have been studied. The first one was to introduce in a standard train composed of wagons capable to carry 40’ containers or 40’ plus 20’ containers a partial flexibility to transport a third container type of 45’ without lengthening the trains and with minimal changes on the wagons. The second idea studied was a new design of a 5 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of around 72m. This solution was aiming to reduce the number of bogies and hence the maintenance cost. A third idea was to develop the same concept for transport of crane-able semitrailers with a 4 bodies wagon with 6 bogies for an overall length of around 67M.
Each of these solutions were studied successfully in term of stability with the mathematical programs of KTH. The cost of these new designs were estimated by NTnetAB and the operational efficiencies calculated when possible or estimated according to expert experience. The impact in terms of temperature reduction with synchronous braking showed a significant decrease on the test benches of Knorr Bremse. Unfortunately new braking methodologies by applying successively strong braking followed by a release have reduced the temperature reached by the blocks and the wheel treads in a zone where the impact of the synchronous braking would not bring significant maintenance cost reduction and damage reduction.
For the new wagon designs the cost benefit analysis show interesting progress for the car carrier wagon and the container wagon but not for the pocket wagons. The flexibility of putting a third of the number of container with a length of 45’ without lengthening the train may be very promising. Finally an extremely promising field is to significantly reduce the preparation time before the departure of the train with the introduction of an EOT (End of Train) device. This intermediate deliverable will be completed in the next issue with the introduction of these new designs on the Network and with a possible roadmap to mobilize investors to create these new wagons.

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D231 - Co-modal Transshipments and Terminals (intermediate)

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This Deliverable is basing on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions. The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, etc.), (...)

This Deliverable is basing on the general aims of CAPACITY4RAIL (C4R): to pave the way for the future railway system, delivering coherent, demonstrated, innovative and sustainable solutions.
The deliverable objective is the conceptual design of transhipment technologies and Interchanges of the future 2030 and 2050 (rail yards, intermodal terminals, shunting facilities, rail-sea ports, etc.), according to their role in co-modal transhipment to influence freight demand distribution, both by operation improvements and logistic advantages.
Indeed, European rail freight has not progressed in parallel with the European economy: during the last century, the single wagon was the core business of railways; today, in contrast to the decline of conventional rail freight, combined transport has shown signs of growth.
Currently, rail freight transport consists of two main typologies: conventional rail freight services (wagonload) and combined transport services, which include the notion of transhipment and the flow of goods from an origin to an intermediate destination, and from there to another destination.
Terminals are a key element of transport services and, in this study, the main goal has been to suggest suitable methods to evaluate the performance of different types of rail freight terminals, which are applicable to various families of terminals:
-  Rail to road for long distance and shorter range units transfer;
-  Rail to rail for shunting and/or gauge interchange;
-  Rail to waterways (sea and inland).
To evaluate the performance of the typologies of terminals listed above and the influence of innovative operational measures and new technologies on their operation, we have chosen to use both analytical methods based on sequential application of algorithms (e.g. from queuing theory) and discrete event simulation models.
These methods and models have been tested on different terminals for the three typical case studies (Road-Rail, Sea-Rail, and Rail-Rail), evaluating both the global performance of the terminal and the performance of its components.
The first case study selected for the pilot application of methods and models and the evaluation of future scenarios is the terminal located in Munich Riem, operated by the DB owned company DUSS.
The set of road-rail terminals considered as case studies includes three intermodal terminals located in Antwerp: Combinant, Hupac and Zomerweg.
The Port of Valencia’s Principe Felipe Railway Terminal has been the selected as a case study for searail terminals.
Finally, Hallsberg case study deals with the largest marshalling yard in Sweden, both in the number of wagons handled and surface extension.
To evaluate the impact of the technological and management innovations introduced, the selected methods and models calculated corresponding Key Performances Indicators (KPI) for each of the scenarios.
The calculation of KPIs uses both analytical methods and the simulation models, compared with real world data, the case studies, allowing an estimation of the achievable level of accuracy.
Moreover, two logistic chains have been analysed, to identify the main measurable elements potentially affecting the operational and management phases, as well as the typical distribution of costs, distance and time and the distribution between rail, road and transhipment for case studies 1 and 2.
It emerged that novel technologies such as Information and Communication Technology (ICT) systems and Intelligent Transport Systems (ITS) are useful for freight management in an intermodal transport chain.
Based on the innovative operational measures and technologies considered in WP2.1 and WP2.2, the scenarios for the case studies to be analyzed include a combination of elements. The analysis use the selected methods and models, taking into account their progressive temporal implementation.
The application of the selected analytical methods and simulation models has provided results illustrated in histograms for the most reliable results of a selection of KPI.
The implementation of new technologies and operational measures lead to a general increase of the key performance indicators and, consequently, an increase of terminal performance.

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SP3 - Operations for enhanced capacity

D311 Review of existing practices to improve capacity on the European rail network

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D321 Evaluation measures and selected scenarios

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The purpose of SP3 of the Capacity 4 Rail project is to increase capacity by better methods for timetable planning and operational traffic and to analyse and evaluate capacity of infrastructure and new traffic systems. We have identified four planning horizons, which are strategic level (building of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling), operational level (shortterm rescheduling and (...)

The purpose of SP3 of the Capacity 4 Rail project is to increase capacity by better methods for timetable planning and operational traffic and to analyse and evaluate capacity of infrastructure and new traffic systems. We have identified four planning horizons, which are strategic level (building of infrastructure), tactical level (timetabling), operational level (shortterm rescheduling and dispatching) and driver advisory system (real-time). This deliverable analyses the existing methods for the tactical and operational levels from the aspect of their application for the enhancement of capacity utilisation. Improved methods in analytic, simulation and optimisation models for operational traffic control will raise either capacity utilisation (number of trains) or the punctuality.
Operational control of railway traffic is recognised as the critical point in railway systems that requires an improvement. The application of novel computer-based decision support systems is recognised as a potential approach. The discrepancy between the current state of the existing tools for real-time traffic control and the practical operational requirements is identified as the main gap. The focus of the future work will therefore be in overcoming the obstacles that are preventing a straightforward application of the laboratory tools in a realworld environment.
A set of potential scenarios that are required to validate the approaches is presented. The scenarios comprise the potential environments where the enhanced models could be applied. Different perspectives for defining the scenarios are considered. The scope and size, traffic heterogeneity, signalling system, the current level of traffic control and the availability of data are recognised as the crucial criteria for defining the scenarios. Finally, the Swedish southern mainline is recognised as the potential scenario that could be an appropriate instance for validation and evaluation of the models.
Next steps are: Task 3.2.4 Enhancing frameworks for simulations and modelling and Task 3.2.5 Initial evaluation of scenarios.

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D341 Data notation and modelling

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Deliverable 3.4.1 of the CAPACITY4RAIL project focuses on data formats and models for data exchange used in the railway sector with considerations of approaches in other transport modes. The focus is on open data formats that have the potential to substitute proprietary data formats in the future. It analysis three usage scenarios, where data exchange is and will be important to guarantee (...)

Deliverable 3.4.1 of the CAPACITY4RAIL project focuses on data formats and models for data exchange used in the railway sector with considerations of approaches in other transport modes. The focus is on open data formats that have the potential to substitute proprietary data formats in the future. It analysis three usage scenarios, where data exchange is and will be important to guarantee effective usage of railway capacity:

  • Consistent cross industry infrastructure data;
  • Effective usage of multimodal transport systems;
  • Real-time operations across organisational and member state borders.

For each use case, visions for 2020, 2030 and 2050 are outlined, the feasibility of relevant data formats, models and concepts are presented, and current gaps are demonstrated.

The deliverable concludes by making some recommendations on priority areas for data
modelling work in the CAPACITY4RAIL project:

  • Interaction of IM asset data sets with OpenStreetMap data in a round-trip process;
  • Upgrade of ON-TIME RTTP regarding railML 3 / UIC-RailTopoModel, and proposing it to the railML community;
  • Incorporate the consolidated findings of SP4 on sensor data into the upgraded RTTP;
  • Comparison of Schematron- and Ontology-based approaches for railway data verification;
  • Development of ontologies supporting Linked open data from specific formats such
    as railML and NeTEx;
  • Demonstrating the developed ontologies in typical use cases, oriented at the stories
    of this document.
    The question on how the data sets in the proposed data formats and models shall interact in order to enable scenario-oriented software solutions, will be answered in the deliverable D3.4.2 in form of architecture recommendations.
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SP4 - Advanced monitoring

D421 Requirements for next generation monitoring and inspection

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This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.2 under Sub- Project 4 (SP4) of the Capacity4Rail project. The aim of this deliverable is to set out the basis for the selection of the most suitable components of the monitoring system, such as devices, methods and tools, to be integrated in upgraded and new infrastructure elements leading to the achievement of the general goals of (...)

This report is the first deliverable for Work Package 4.2 under Sub- Project 4 (SP4) of the
Capacity4Rail project.
The aim of this deliverable is to set out the basis for the selection of the most suitable components of the monitoring system, such as devices, methods and tools, to be integrated in upgraded and new infrastructure elements leading to the achievement of the general goals of the Capacity4Rail project, i.e. the design and development of an affordable, adaptable, automated, resilient and high capacity railway system.
First of all, a set of functional and technical requirements at low level, mid level and high level has been defined. Once scored, the features of the monitoring components can be assessed together with their cost in an evaluation framework (spreadsheet) developed to this end, giving the best value to the solution that better meets the functional and technical
requirements at minimum cost.
This methodology will be helpful in the work to be done in Tasks 4.2.2 and 4.2.3, in charge of the selection of sensor, energy harvesting, communication and data integration technologies.

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SP5 - System assessment and migration to 2030/2050

SP6 / WP61 - Dissemination, Exploitation and Training